Helping hedgehogs

Hedgehogs ‘vulnerable to extinction’

British hedgehogs are now officially classified as ‘vulnerable to extinction’. They appear on the first red list for UK mammals, published in July 2020.

British hedgehogs are now officially classed as ‘vulnerable to extinction’

According to the new list, a quarter of native mammals in the UK are now at risk of extinction with key reasons including a lack of good habitat and a failure to link habitats with wildlife corridors. The loss of hedgerows and the introduction of fencing that prevents hedgehogs gaining access to enough gardens in urban areas are also key issues.

There has never been a more important time to support the work of your local wildlife rescue in helping to save vulnerable species and raising awareness of how you can help to prevent further decline.

You can read my top tips on how to make your garden more wildlife friendly here.

One of the best things you can do is to create a hedgehog highway to ensure that hedgehogs can roam to find sufficient food and a mate.

Hedgehog highway in my wildlife garden

Creating a wildlife haven packed with plants and providing supplementary food can also help.

I run a hedgehog hospital in York, England. You can find out more about my work here. You can also support my work by making a donation here. If you are looking for your local hedgehog rescue, there are some great links on this page.

I make beautiful jewellery inspired by nature and wildlife to raise funds for my hedgehog rescue and awareness work. Please visit my online shop at www.littlesilverhedgehog.etsy.com

5 thoughts on “Hedgehogs ‘vulnerable to extinction’”

  1. I’ve had to rescue two baby hedgehogs this year found laying almost dead sprawled out in the middle of the garden where I work. After being warmed up and syringe fed water we gave them some cat food. When they seemed fine we released them. We continue to put food out at night.They still return for midnight feasts. Thank you for all your hard work and for following me.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s